$400k Closed in 30 Days. Cold Email is Not Dead-

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Growth Story is a weekly podcast that breaks down the strategy and tactics utilized by high growth companies, in a short case study format hosted by Scott D. Clary (@scottdclary).

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What's going on Scott here? Welcome to another episode of the Success Story PODCAST. Today, how one agency owner closed four Hundredzero of revenue in thirty days with just cold email. We're going to break it down. It's a case study, all right. So we're going to get into a case study how Alex Berman, who is the founder of x twenty seven, closed four hundredzero dollars in revenue in thirty days with cold email. So cold email isn't dead. Cold email isn't dead. Cold email isn't dead, but many people don't use it properly. Many people don't get how to use cold email to properly grow their business, to sell their services. There's a lot of bad advice out there and the stuff that I'm going to speak about, that Alex did is not rocket science, it's not ground breaking. You can find similar strategies in other corners of the Internet, but he just executed on something and he applied common sense to it and a closed four hundred thousand dollars. So let's write down this, this case study and what he did, and I want to I obviously want to cite the source. So I actually got the idea to build this case study and and sort of walk through what Alex did from a Proposi Fi podcast. If you want to listen to the podcast where Alex sits down and speaks with Kyle Racki, who is a CEO propose Afy, you can go check it out at propose a FIVECOM podcast zero zero too.

But I'm going to break down and I'm going to give a few additional takeaway so let's Burnman, founder of x twenty seven. He used cold email to close four in a thousand dollars of business in thirty days over the life of x twenty seven, which is in a it's Inn A. It's a marketing agency. Basically it's a marketing agency that provides outsourced marketing services for their clients. So when they go in, they're saying we're going to take care and end of your marketing needs. You're hiring us. That's all you'll ever need. So that's that's basically what he's selling. And to just go over some of the financials, this story is about how he closed four and a thousand dollars and thirty days. But he charges eighty five hundred dollars for an initial marketing review or audit of the target customers, complete, website, brand, social, you name it. He audits it for about eighty five hundred bucks and after he's done the review or the audit, then they charge eight to fourteen thousand dollars monthly as a retainer for fully outsourced marketing services. So this is the five step process that he uses to close these sales and in the podcast he speaks about how, after he does the eighty five hundred audit he has a hundred percent close rate on the eight to fourteen thousand dollar a month retainer, which is an incredible stat so step one he builds a case study. So what Alex does is he gets a customer win and he built a case study from that customer win. The example he uses. He's done multiple case studies for multiple customer wins. But he was hired on to work with the University of Oklahoma. When he worked with them, he spent a considerable...

...amount of time throughout the process, when he was actually delivering on what they were actually purchasing from him, as well as after the delivery, on interviewing decision makers at the university, people that he worked with at the university. So so he was spending a ton of time on building at this case study from this one customer, that that there was a great customer. So what did he get out of that? Well, he got about the pain, the reason why the university even jumped on a demo call with him in the first place. He was speaking about the actual scope of the project. So what the university required them to actually execute on. He spoke about how they actually implemented. So the Daytoday, project management, the tasks, the duties and then, of course, the the outcome, the final result. After you know that you brought this university into your sales funnel, you you go through like you you sell them, you close them, you actually have to execute on all the things you promised. Then there's some results and KPIS that you want to hit. What were those? How did you you know, did you exceed those Kpis? He put down everything that he did with his university, but he also interview people from the university to make it more real. So he compiled the case study. He only worried about creating one case study for that one university, but he just made it super, super super detailed and he made it so that anybody who was actually reading this case study would know exactly like, with intimate, intimate detail, what he had accomplished with the University of Oklahoma. So now that he has a case study done, what does he do with it? Well, they has to figure out how he can use this case study as marketing collateral and sales collateral to go close more clients. So we remember, you only has one case study focused on one university, so it's not like that's going to be incredibly useful for a huge amount of clients that aren't other university. So now step two. He goes into targeting. So what he did as you compile the list of...

...fifty companies or fifty targets that would benefit from the case study, the Super, super indepth case study that he just created, the more niche the better, the more specific the better. He only targeted universities. So what was the result from him targeting universities? Obviously similar potential customers to what what you know what he spoke about in the case study. He got a meeting with Yale, with UCLA and with Osu. So main takeaway is the more, the more niche down your case study is and the more similar your target potential customers to your case study, the better be extremely specific. The the more specific the better, the better the chance that that case studies going to be useful for the person who you're trying to reach out to. Now, how does he actually target? And we kind of understand. So what that can be equated to would be his ideal customer profile? Right? His is company that he wants to target. Now, so he's figured out that he wants to target universities. So how did he do this to make sure he could properly target companies? He uses linkedin sales navigator. Last time I checked, it costs roughly sixty dollars a month, plus, of course, with one deal you're going to pay that off. So it's not a big deal. It's not a huge expense. And the reason why he uses linkedin sales navigator is because linkedin sales navigator is one of the most useful tools for targeting, for again, being extremely specific in who you target. So because the strategy, the core tenet of this strategy, relies on you being specific, you need the filtering options that linkedin sales navigator can give you when you're trying to find your customers. What linkedin sales navigator allows you to do is it not just find, for example, chief marketing officer or, you know, a...

CEO. It allows you to drill down into industry type, job function, geography, company size. There's a ton of different identifiers that linkedin sales navigator gives you, so you can get hyper, hyper, hyper specific on who you want to target. After he has this list of people, he's throwing them into a google docs or a google sheet. And then now he has this list of people that Hyper Pacific, hyper specific. Excuse me. So he has they're all going to be, if we're going to use this example, all decision makers at universities similar to the University of Oklahoma. And then, after he gets this list of people, he's going to put them into Google Doc. Remember, he's just targeted them and pulled them. He doesn't have their emails yet, but he's going to put them into Google doc or a google spreadsheets or google sheet, excuse me. And now he's going to use a tool like any mail finder, or he also used email hunter to find the emails of the people that he needs to reach out to. So these tools are again there. They're relatively and expensive, they have a pretty high success rate and you use them to just find mask groups of people. So now, after he has the he's targeted on, he has his, you know, his ideal customer profile. He's targeted on the universities that he wants to actually go after. He's found the people within the universities. He's found their email addresses and some of these email address finding tools you can also find. You can also find a phone numbers. If you're looking for a good phone number research tool, use something called signal higher. He didn't mention that in this particular interview, but it's a really, really good tool for finding phone numbers. After okay, so next step. Okay. So he has a list of people who want to reach out to. You have to get your emails down. You have to get your copy the stuff that's actually in your emails. You have to get it down. So Alex has some more ideas on what type of emails work, what type of emails get open,...

...get replied back to. So a few rules that he has for the copy and the content that goes into his emails. For a subject line, he uses something very simple. He says question about company. So that's a very simple, simple subject line. And for the body of his email he says he uses this text. You know, you can massage it and use it as you will for whatever you're trying to accomplish, but this is sort of like the core that he tries to build his emails on. So, Hey, first name, big fan of company name and have been for a long time. We just built an APP for competitor name that does X, Y Z. We think that your company could get some value out of it. I also have a few more ideas around APP development design. If you want to chat. Is that that does excuse me, this is that? Does that sound like something you'd be interested in? If so, I can send over sometimes to chat. Thanks, Alex. very simple to the point. A couple additional email rules that he does follow. The cold email shouldn't be longer than what would fit into a phone screen. So you know, if you have your phone, you open up an email, you can see the whole email in that in that screen on your on your phone. That means they don't have to scroll. Second rule, the more customized the better. This is also again this is standard, standard stuff, but these are things that you know common senses in common. So the more customized the better. Now a lot of people focus on customizing the email text, the subject line. That's important. But what Alex mentions? It's smart. He's saying that if you focus on customizing the case study, you don't have to focus as much on customizing your email. So because the case study that he created was so, so, so specific, he gets away a little bit with less customization in the actual email. And lastly, his his tip for cold...

...emails are cold outreach is give as much away for free as possible. So give additional information, give them free resources, give them like a high level, if you're selling, for example, marketing services, like key was a high level free audit. As much as you can give away for free. Give it away for free, because it will always lead to more business in the end. And also it has the added bonus not only are you being very useful and helpful, you're positioning yourself as a subject matter expert in your field. It's you have the added bonus that you come across less need. You come across as less needy when you're selling. So this is a psychological benefit when you're actually trying to sell something. Okay, and then step number four in his four hundred thousand dollar strategy get your email cadence down and you have to have an email caidence. So Alex usually only gets a response by the third or fourth email. So we always sets up cadences that are minimum three to four emails. Do not do less than that. If you if you only send out one email, if he only sent out one email, he would have a grand total of zero dollars in sales. That's a little bit less than four hundred thousand. He's a firm believer that there's really only two reasons why a customer wouldn't respond after for emails. Number One, they failed to understand what you're providing or the value that you offer, and if that's the case, then it's your fault. Or number two, they really are very busy. So if you send for emails, you're making sure that you're staying on top of the customers mind. And then the last piece that he uses is he does use phone, but you can see that the majority of a strategy was called outbound email. But the fifth step is phone. He does a quick call, he does one call. He calls the people that have received his emails and opened his emails and he's only calling after the...

...fourth email to follow up with people. He doesn't even want to get them on the phone. He wants to leave them a voicemail saying hey, by the way, did you get my email? He's just checking to see if they've actually received and open the email and he can see who receives his emails. He can see who opens his emails. He uses a tool called yes where for this. So it's a very simple, quick call. You're not asking for a call back. That's a lot of that's a big ask for somebody you don't know. All you're doing is you're just saying, Hey, I'm not sure if you if you saw it or not, but I just sent you a quick email. Take a look and you can reply back the email if this is something that interests you. So you're just, you know, very simple and you're not asking a lot. You're not making a big request of the person reaching out to. Is just another way to reach them and it just jogs are memory of the email that that he had sent them. So if you you know a few, that's that's pretty much the strategy. That is a strategy. So if you go through a quickly again, we have number one, create a really compelling niche case study. Number to get your targeting right. Use tools to be able to target as much as possible. Super Specific, Super Niche number three, get your email copy down short, you know, short and sweet, to the point. You don't have to explain too much in your email copy. Number four, have a cadence and number five, have a quick call and that's it. That's what he did again and again and again to close four hundred thousand dollars in sales. So let's just let's just one more point, because Alex really went into detailing. Gave a really a lot of really great information and you can take that. You can apply it tomorrow. But a few takeaways. The reason why a lot of people don't get the results they want with the email is not because cold email is dead, or not because the email is dead. It's because what happens is you pull a million contacts, you send email to...

...all those contacts and you hope that you know, one or two percent of them are going to respond back and purchase your product. It doesn't work. Throwing Shit at the wall and hoping something sticks doesn't work. Be Purposeful. Know who your customers are, target, personalized, all the things that require more effort. You know the saying do things that don't scale, all the things that require more effort is what leads to long term success. So please, if you are trying to sell a product or service, do not just spam an automate absolutely everything and trying to reach everyone on planet earth to sell your product, because it will not work. What will work is is knowing who you're reaching out to, creating marketing assets, collateral or just offering value that actually mean something to them, and then then you can you can actually reach out to them. You can, you know, put them into some sort of cadence, again, not automated, not just bombarding them, but a cadence that's thoughtful because you're providing value. You want to help them accomplish something that you truly believe that they should be able to that they would want your help with accomplishing, and that's really the main secret to successful, effective email. What Alex did was one version of a very successful, well thought out personalized email campaign. I really, really, really love the bit that he's at the beginning with the case study, because that's something that I don't think a lot of people think of, but that's, at the end of the day, the differentiator between four hundredzero dollars and zero dollars. anyways, hope you enjoyed. I put these case studies in newsletters. So, if video isn't your thing, go to newsletter dot Roy overloadcom and you can check out all these types of case studies in a weekly newsletter format. Hope you...

...enjoyed. If you like this, share this with friends, family. Piers Co workers will talk against it by now. I.

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